Brand Publishing Tips & Strategies With Martin Wanless

Brand storytelling and publishing are becoming buzz words. But the ability to do content marketing right is eluding many companies. Learn best practices in digital and how to identify your key  performance indicators to determine your success. 

How do you create that quality content is still the challenge for people especially if they haven’t
got journalism experience or haven’t got journalism training. So find the experts that you can tap
into, whether they are within the organisation or outside the organisation, who can help tell the story.

                                                                                                                     –Martin Wanless.

 

Martin is Chief Content Officer at Sydney-based content agency Mahlab Media, where he 

manages an in-house team of writers, videographers and social media experts who create 

business-aligned content that’s genuinely useful for their clients’ audiences. He has been with 

Mahlab Media since 2010, after 10 years with UK trade exhibition organiser ITE Moda, where 

he managed the day-to-day activity in the company’s publishing division, and worked with the 

marketing and PR team.

 

What You’ll Learn

  • What we can learn from traditional media publications.

  • How to establish best practices in a digital era.

  • How to bring stories to life that are compelling for your target audience.

  • How niche and small publication runs can really help build your company.

  • Why brands will need to develop apps for content.

  • The biggest challenge with content marketing and how to address it.

  • Understanding Key Performance Indicators (KPI) for brand storytelling.

 

Key Takeaways

1. Dig deep into your audience and find the stories that really matter or else you face getting lost in digital clutter.

2. Create series of stories. Explainer videos are great way to dig deeper into a niche topic. 

3. Use your content to “spinoff”  a particular topic, creating more content pieces so that you can maximise and leverage the content.

4. Have the right philosophy. Building a loyal following comes from the publication creating an environment that people want to be part of and want to share its content.

5. Create experiences that people want to be part of and want to spread the message.

6. Consider how your content can be turned into an app.

7. Identify your goals and ways to measure it. Set a time frame and start with a benchmark.

8. Make sure your content creation has laser focus on what is a successful outcome. 

9. Know the value of your customer. 

10. Use vital KPIs. For instance, a good KPI is to increase your email list which can lead to greater sales conversions.

11. Think quality over quantity: The story must be good or it will be overlooked and ignored.

12. Maximise and leverage your content by repurposing it to multiple platforms.

 

Never miss an episode of Brand Storytelling, subscribe here

 

Mentioned in this episode

Robert Rose episode #20

Pineapple, Airbnb Magazine 

The Guardian app

TheBigPitch.au

 

Contact

Twitter @MartyWan78

Mahlab Media Website

Brand Publishing Tips & Strategies With Martin Wanless

Brand storytelling and publishing are becoming buzz words. But the ability to do content marketing right is eluding many companies. Learn best practices in digital and how to identify your key  performance indicators to determine your success. 

How do you create that quality content is still the challenge for people especially if they haven’t
got journalism experience or haven’t got journalism training. So find the experts that you can tap
into, whether they are within the organisation or outside the organisation, who can help tell the story.

                                                                                                                     –Martin Wanless.

 

Martin is Chief Content Officer at Sydney-based content agency Mahlab Media, where he 

manages an in-house team of writers, videographers and social media experts who create 

business-aligned content that’s genuinely useful for their clients’ audiences. He has been with 

Mahlab Media since 2010, after 10 years with UK trade exhibition organiser ITE Moda, where 

he managed the day-to-day activity in the company’s publishing division, and worked with the 

marketing and PR team.

 

What You’ll Learn

  • What we can learn from traditional media publications.

  • How to establish best practices in a digital era.

  • How to bring stories to life that are compelling for your target audience.

  • How niche and small publication runs can really help build your company.

  • Why brands will need to develop apps for content.

  • The biggest challenge with content marketing and how to address it.

  • Understanding Key Performance Indicators (KPI) for brand storytelling.

 

Key Takeaways

1. Dig deep into your audience and find the stories that really matter or else you face getting lost in digital clutter.

2. Create series of stories. Explainer videos are great way to dig deeper into a niche topic. 

3. Use your content to “spinoff”  a particular topic, creating more content pieces so that you can maximise and leverage the content.

4. Have the right philosophy. Building a loyal following comes from the publication creating an environment that people want to be part of and want to share its content.

5. Create experiences that people want to be part of and want to spread the message.

6. Consider how your content can be turned into an app.

7. Identify your goals and ways to measure it. Set a time frame and start with a benchmark.

8. Make sure your content creation has laser focus on what is a successful outcome. 

9. Know the value of your customer. 

10. Use vital KPIs. For instance, a good KPI is to increase your email list which can lead to greater sales conversions.

11. Think quality over quantity: The story must be good or it will be overlooked and ignored.

12. Maximise and leverage your content by repurposing it to multiple platforms.

 

Never miss an episode of Brand Storytelling, subscribe here

 

Mentioned in this episode

Robert Rose episode #20

Pineapple, Airbnb Magazine 

The Guardian app

TheBigPitch.au

 

Contact

Twitter @MartyWan78

Mahlab Media Website

Word of Mouth Marketing: how to get your customers talking

By Rachel Kurzyp

Organic word of mouth has long been a great way for businesses to on-board new customers, but how can marketers strategise to maximise its effect?

Today, 92 per cent of customers believe recommendations from friends and family over traditional advertising.

The problem is word of mouth  is not easily planned, actioned or tracked.  The solution is to organise a word of mouth marketing (WOMM) strategy.  

Brands understand the significance of word of mouth marketing yet, only 6 per cent say they have mastered it.

This is because brands have been focusing on collecting social media fans instead of connecting with them. WOMM is an integral part of your content marketing strategy. It requires work, foresight and creativity.

Here are four tips to get you started on your next campaign. 

Be interesting

Nobody talks about boring companies, products or ads. You have to do something special if you want people to talk about you. Before you run an ad, launch a product or produce content, ask yourself: Would anyone tell a friend about this? If the answer is no, rethink your angle.

Remember, people aren’t going to talk about product features, but they will tell their friends about the benefits.

Make it easy

Word of mouth is the laziest component of a content marketing strategy. You’ve got to help it along if you want it to go anywhere.

You need to do two things: create a simple message and help people share it. Start with a topic that anyone can remember and limit it to one sentence. Anything longer will just get distorted or forgotten.

Second, find ways to make it easier to spread your message. An announcement on your website or brochure is a good place to start. Sharing your message in an email or via a social network will truly set the wheels in motion.

Make people happy

Happy customers are your greatest advertisers.

Go the extra mile to make their day and surprise them. When people like you they will want to help and support your business. They will also want their friends to enjoy what you have to offer.

Incorporate simple actions into your content marketing strategy to help your brand connect with its customers:

  • Ask customers to provide feedback on a product.
  • Have management thank customers.
  • Send personalised welcome emails when customers subscribe to your newsletter.

Earn trust and respect

Nobody talks positively about a company they don’t respect, trust or like. Business ethics should be at the heart of everything you do. Always have your customers in mind. Talk to them and fulfil their needs.

Ask yourself: Would people be proud to tell your brand’s story to their friends? If not, think about how you can change this. Do you need to reduce the amount of non-targeted content you are sending or give customers a break from financial asks?

WOMM is about joining and participating in genuine customer conversations. How are you going to connect with your customers and get them talking?

One way to get a conversation flowing with your customers is to produce engaging and shareable content. Newsmodo are experts in content creation, contact us for your next marketing campaign. 

 

Rachel Kurzyp Bio: A writer and communications consultant helping businesses build their digital story.

Website: http://www.rachelkurzyp.com.au 

 

 

Why Brands Must Be Good Storytellers with Joe Pulizzi

He’s known as the Godfather of Content Marketing. Joe Pulizzi of the Content Marketing Institute shares why brands must be good storytellers and why most content marketing strategies fail. Plus, how you can start your strategy today.

Joe Pulizzi is the founder of Content Marketing Institute, the leading education and training organisation for content marketing. The CMI holds the largest in-person content marketing event in the world – Content Marketing World. Joe is the winner of the 2014 John Caldwell Lifetime Achievement Award from the Content Council.  Joe’s third book, “Epic Content Marketing: How to Tell a Different Story, Break through the Clutter, and Win More Customers by Marketing Less” was named one of “Five Must Read Business Books of 2013” by Fortune Magazine. You can find Joe on Twitter @JoePulizzi. If you ever see Joe in person, he’ll be wearing orange.

If you can fine-tune your storytelling skills and you understand what’s important to your audience, I think you’re going to be just fine.

 

Mentioned In This Episode

Not many Australian marketers actually consider their companies effective at content marketing (just 29% this year and 33% last year). However, the data also shows that marketers with a documented content marketing strategy fare better in this area: Up to 44% of those who have a documented strategy say they are effectively rolling it out. 

The Big Pitch – Oxygen Ventures: A Look At The Biggest Startups

 

What You’ll Learn

  • What jobs are available for journalists today.

  • Why content marketing is no longer an experiment.

  • Which types of strategic formats you should use for your content marketing.

  • What Marriott is doing for the travel and publishing industry.

  • To think beyond a campaign mentality.

  • Upcoming trends for 2015-2016.

  • Why most content marketing strategies fail.

  • Why you must have a mobile-friendly and responsive design for your Website.

 

Key Takeaways

  1. Don’t target everyone: focus on a core audience. Have a clear direction and targeted information to share.

  2. Find a niche where you can be an expert and share high-quality information for that marketplace.

  3. Print magazines are making a comeback.

  4. Use storytelling in your print campaigns coupled with in-person events.

  5. There are many ways to tell stories.

  6. Focus on one audience: get executives together, launch a program for six months, commit to it, and deliver with consistency, take it seriously, and be deliberate with your distribution.

  7. Average time to monetisation 15-17 months.

  8. The two critical success factors are: having a strategic plan and being consistent with content creation and distribution.

  9. Big brands may have success buying a media brand to accelerate the content marketing.

  10. Most traffic will be viewed on mobile devices in the very near future. So understand the importance of mobile marketing.

 

Don’t miss an episode of Brand Storytelling, subscribe on iTunes.

Contact

Content Marketing Institute

Twitter @JoePulizzi 

 

 

Why Brands Should Put Story First

As brands, we need to speak to our customers more like friends. Instead of adding to the noise and clutter, or asking things of our customers all the time, we need to add value. That way we create two-way relationships with depth and meaning, writes Nick Acquroff.  

In this era of digital content we are always chasing elusive equations to success.

After following one of these equations straight to failure, I realised there is something much more important when it comes to earning and retaining a loyal audience.

That is, telling an honest and interesting story.

I won my first social media account while I was still at university. The client was one of the most respected clothing brands in Melbourne, but they’d taken a hit recently as online retailers disrupted their bricks and mortar business model. At that stage, they were ready to try just about anything.  

So I joined a new marketing team – myself and two members of a local marketing group who were really pleased with their formula for social media success.

They were concerned, in the most part, by the mathematical equations behind driving sales and – because I had no one else to follow – so was I.

Two months in, and we’d done a hell of a lot of damage.

 

In the weeks that followed we came up with plans to drive traffic to the online store by sending out EDM’s and having competitions.

This involved retargeting people who had clicked through to the website, writing SEO Blog articles that always started with the line, ‘Afternoon, Gents,’ and had a list of something in the title like ‘Five Shirts for the Spring Carnival.’

This was called the funnel system, a process whereby we’d give out clothes for free or promote discounted items on Facebook and Instagram in exchange for emails addresses.

This was the top of the funnel – where we got them in – and then we’d flood them with offers by email, something too good to be true, aimed at getting customers through to the online checkout.

Once we had them in we thought, they were likely to stay, and we could then raise our prices back up to where they belonged.

The only problem was, that in just two months, we’d gone a long way into destroying the reputation the brand had built up over almost 90 years. Suddenly, the brand had become nothing more than an afterthought you might grab on your way past the bargain barrel.

Furthermore, these new social media fans weren’t being welcomed into a flourishing community. They were more like university students waiting in line for a free hot dog on orientation day.

I was going to find whatever it was that made this brand interesting, and I was going to tell that story to the world

 

Our brand had no story, no depth, no principles, and no catchcry. We hadn’t even thought about those things. We had thought only of the numbers – and in doing so, we’d raised the number of sales on their online store significantly without increasing their overall take. 

Two months in, and we’d done a hell of a lot of damage.

This led to the sacking of staff from marketing – I was left entirely to my own devices to run the account.  

My MO was to change things, and quickly. So that Monday I tore up the funnel diagram on my desk, turned off the remarketing advertisements, cancelled all the upcoming sales, and took a walk around the office.

I had a new angle: I was going to find whatever it was that made this brand interesting, and I was going to tell that story to the world, or whoever would listen, with every ounce of energy and authenticity I had.

So I went out into the factory with my camera and took photos of the guys on the sewing machines, I asked them how long they’d been working at the business, what they’d seen change and about the industry.

I asked the same questions of the designers and what made our clothes different to the others, their dreams, hopes, and goals.

After that I visited the stores and spoke to the staff on the floor, and got photographs of customers trying the clothes on. I asked them what they liked about the fits, what it was that made them feel good in one of our suits, and I wrote down their answers.  

I then put photographs of all these people out through Facebook and Instagram, with quotes. Instead of blog articles for SEO with titles, I wrote stories about the business and the products they had decades before.

We still had competitions and retargeting, sure, but these were much more sporadic, and they were always surrounded by content that focused on discovery and story.

Finally, we had something to say, a brand to build on, and over time, we gained a hugely loyal follower base – people who identified with the history and the craft.

We had comments on almost every post and people were sharing and engaging with our content.

It’s the same principle we work on when we have life long friends and relationships. We have friends because we are interesting people, and in order to stay friends, we have to connect in a meaningful way.

We don’t keep friends because we give them things or call them all the time. The same principle applies for brands.

  

Nick Acquroff is Creative Director at Paperfox. A digital media company based in Melbourne. 

What Is The ‘Experience Marketing’ Era? With Robert Rose

Chief Strategy Officer for the Content Marketing Institute, Robert Rose, says we’re in the “experience marketing era”. Find out what that means and why brands must be not only creating quality content but providing true value and experience for consumers.

Robert Rose is in the business of helping marketers become stellar storytellers. In addition to his role at the Content Marketing Institute, he is a Senior Contributing Consultant for Digital Clarity Group, Robert helps develop content marketing and customer experience strategies for large companies such as Oracle, The Bill And Melinda Gates Foundation, Allstate Insurance, Staples, Hewlett Packard, AT&T, Petco and UPS  – helping them tell their story more effectively.

 

What You’ll Learn.

  • A bit of trivia about the term “soap operas”.
  • The eras of brand storytelling.
  • Why the 7th era of marketing is all about customer experiences.
  • How to get intimate with the customer.
  • How to differentiate your company by creating a “moment of inspiration”.
  • Why you sometimes need to slow down the sales and marketing process.
  • How content can function as a process within your business.

 

Key Takeaways

1.    The “relationship era” is not dead.

2.    This is the age of the “experience” marketing era.

3.    Products and services are easy to replicate; experiences are not.

4.    Lego creates an experience. The brand does not focus on its plastic toys.

5.    HubSpot invented the “inbound experience” and transformed the industry. They created a company around the brand.

6.    Reduce your content creation and instead focus on experiences.

7.    Create experiences that create value for the consumer and make them want to use your products and services.

8.    Don’t separate content marketing from your traditional marketing. Instead work to make your overall marketing better.

Contact

Twitter @RobertRose

Content Marketing Institute

Top 5 Insights from Mumbrella 360

By Rakhal Ebeli

Bringing together hundreds of brands, creative agencies and professional marketers, the Mumbrella 360 annual conference gave a high resolution snapshot of where marketing is today – and where it is likely to be tomorrow.

It offered a vision of an increasingly blurred media landscape, where mobile rules, brands publish and agencies diversify as the battle to win customer loyalty becomes ever more difficult.

So, what’s the lesson? What does the success and strategy of brands like MTV and Qantas tell us about the future of marketing?

Newsmodo has distilled two days of diverse media session from the industry’s leaders into five simple insights – applicable to all business regardless of size or marketing budget. 

 

1. Hunt your competitor not your consumer

The first rule of marketing is wrong. According to Ashton Bishop, Head of Strategy, Step Change Marketing, marketing needs to go beyond just “meeting the customer needs.”

As he pointed out, ”What happens when those needs are met?”

To gain a competitive advantage, marketers need to prey on their competitor – not the consumer.

This is due to what he called the five-ninth factor.  Astoundingly, five-ninths of marketing is wrongly attributed to the market leader. See the end of a shoe commercial and you assume it’s for Nike. See a poster for soft drink and most people will believe it’s for Coke.

This has a huge impact on small and emerging business. Not only does it make it extremely difficult to cut through, it means they waste time and money on marketing campaigns that customer’s fail to recognise as their own.

So what can brands and business do?

The answer, explained Bishop, is predatory marketing. Predatory marketing is to  “strike at the weakness that arises out of your customer’s greatest strength.”

In real terms, it is the Burger King blow to McDonald’s.  If we agree with Bishop that McDonald’s greatest strength is consistency – in food, delivery, flavour and price, it follows that it’s greatest weakness is personalisation (think before the company’s 2014 campaign to personalise customer experience). Exploiting this weakness, Burger King respond with the Whopper and now-infamous slogan – “have it your way”.

Any brand or business can use predatory marketing to win over customers and build brand awareness. By converting a competitor’s strength into a competitive advantage, small business can define themselves against the market leaders, allowing them to stand out – until they themselves become the market leader.

 

2. Ask better questions

Brands and business need to spend less time on the answers and more time on the question. As Einstein famously said, “If I had 20 days to solve a problem, I would spend 19 days to define it.”

Moderator Rob Pyne, founder of X or Y Decision, argued more marketers need to follow Einstein’s example.

But why? Katie Rigg-Smith, CEO Mindshare, believes brands – big and small, are at risk of missing the bigger picture by not understanding the deeper question.

She saw this first hand working with Michelin. Michelin began with an obvious question – how to sell more tyres – only to realise it was the wrong one.

Rigg-Smith explained: “Their tyres were actually so good that they ended up reframing their questioning to – how do we get people driving more.”

Reframing the question completely changed the campaign, moving it from the qualities of the tyres to the benefits of driving tours.

Better questions lead to better answers. This holds true for both small business and multinationals. By understanding what it is that a business really wants to achieve, change, and influence, business can create more targeted campaigns with more effective results.

 

3. Strategise

While strategy seems like a no-brainer, many businesses still do not have one. Those that do are unconvinced of its effectiveness.

Phil Phelan, national strategy director of SapientNitro, believes this is because there is confusion over what a strategy should be.

So, what is a strategy? Not a plan, not a goal and not a budget, explained Phelan.

“Effective strategy plans for the possible not the predictable,” he argued.

As we enter a new era of disrupted media, “strategy needs to rediscover its core and recover its relevance to business,” he said.

This means moving beyond simple planning to detailed blueprints that account for chaos and use trusted feedback loops to guide decisions and policy. 

 

4. Leave the office

Understanding customer behaviour is crucial to creating successful marketing campaigns. While data now plays an important role, both corporate commando Adam O’Donnell and Rigg-Smith argued this information should be complimented by human observation.

“We need to get away from our desk to be curious about the right questions to ask,” said Rigg-Smith.

The 14-year media veteran, who has worked alongside Jaguar, Nike and American Express, believes marketers need to spend more time in their customer habitats, joking that she has been asked to leave supermarkets for suspiciously loitering in aisles.

Former SAS Trooper O’Donnell agreed. Speaking on his time as a NATO peacekeeper in Bosnia, O’Donnell described how he was able to diffuse tension by talking to the community. It was by going into the field (i.e. leaving the office) that O’Donnell received valuable information that completely changed the outcome of the mission – for the better.

The success of marketing and military campaigns depends on quality of the intelligence. Brands and business need to find more opportunities to enter the field and study how their consumer interacts with their products and services in order to improve their marketing.

 

5. Live your brand story

It is not enough for a brand to have a story – they must live it. According to David Morgan, founder of MORGAN, brand stories are a powerful mnemonic and emotive tool. But it is by embracing a brand story at every business touch point that they become truly invaluable.

Morgan explained how this approach took BankWest from the 15th ranked to the 5th ranked retail bank in Australia.

In this case, the story was “happy banking”. Not only did BankWest promote the message, they lived it. This meant revising the company work culture from top to bottom. Human resources hired positive employees, business hours changed to be more customer-friendly and the CEO and CMO cheered up staff in animal costumes. The message was lived and breathed at every level of business.

Business – of any size – can learn from this example and use their own brand stories to stand out from their competitors and engage consumers.

For more on the brand stories and why they are important, listen to the Newsmodo Brand Storytelling podcast.

Sports Marketing and Connecting With Fans – With Sean Callanan

Sean Callanan is the ultimate sports fan and founder of his company, Sports Geek. He teaches sports brands how to connect with fans and gain exposure by becoming content publishers. Listen, and learn the successful formula for digital sports marketing.
 

Through the Sports Geek Podcast Sean Callanan collaborates with people around the world on sports business and sports digital  (http://sportsgeekhq.com/SGP). Listened to in over 50 countries, Sports Geek Podcast is the premier podcast for sports world professionals. Sean has interviewed guests from NBA, NHL, MLB, MLS, AFL & NRL. These guests include billionaire Dallas Mavericks owner Mark Cuban, Arsenal’s Richard Clarke, Boston Celtics Peter Stringer & LA Kings Dewayne Hankins.

What You’ll Learn

  • How sports and technology are marrying together and creating sports team content publishers.

  • What makes sports publishing resonate with fans.

  • Find out what Arsenal Australia did to create a global following and a good ROI that drives traffic to it’s Website.

  • How to implement user-generated content that’s fuelled by emotion.

  • Which platforms you should use and how much effort should you put into them.

  • How Snapchat can help your brand.

 

 

Here is the case study referred to in the Podcast:

 

 

Key Takeaways

  1. You must build a strong media company and persona for your brand.

  2. Video can help spread the word faster and be used instead of a simple press release to get information to bloggers and the traditional media.

  3. Have a goal, and know why you want to be on a particular social media platform.

  4. You must make a commitment to the social platform and produce regular content to grow a following.

  5. It can take six weeks or more before engagement is seen.

  6. Listen to your fans and the data that is associated with the content.

  7. Define your target audience and be sure that your content plan speaks to that audience.

  8. You must produce content that resonates with all of your fans not just your “super fans”.

  9. Be social. Take the time to engage with your fans to create brand ambassadors and a “digital cheer squad”.

  10. Give your content personality by featuring players from the sports club.

 

Contact

Sports Geek Website

The Sports Geek Podcast

Twitter @SportsGeek

 

Four Keys Elements of Successful Promotional Video Production

Promotional videos help businesses reach out to their clients, customers and others for the purpose of sharing information, creating awareness, and generating interest in the company and its products. By Daniel Calleja.

 

It takes creativity and planning to produce a video which presents the best image of your company while delivering the right message to the intended audience. Consider these four key elements of successful promotional video production

Identify the Message

We are constantly bombarded with information and no one can take it all in.

Whether you are promoting your overall business, or specific products or services, your video should focus on aspects specifically related to a well honed message.

A narrow focus is important so you can get your message across quickly, without including a lot of irrelevant information.

It can be counterproductive when video content lasts longer than the audience’s attention span.

 

Find Your Inspiration

If you want to capture your audience’s attention, your video must be more than a presentation of facts and figures.

As much as we may like to think we make choices based on rational thought, the truth is that emotions play a large part in most of our decisions.

You may want to use humour or an inspiring story to add interest. Highlight the ways in which your business gives back to the community.

 

Creativity

There is a good chance you can barely remember the last promotional video you saw.

If you want your video to be remembered, be creative and make your video something people will want to share and watch again.

There are many ways to be creative and innovative with promotional videos. You can use animation, create interesting characters for your business, speculate on the future of your industry, or devise something unique to you.

 

Show and Tell

Video has the power to inform and persuade better than other types of media. It engages the audience in an experience with verbal, visual and emotional reach.

For example, when explaining how a product works, you can also show how it is used, with people enjoying the benefits it provides.

An effective video conveys the look and feel of your business along with intangible elements which cannot be expressed with just words.

 

Daniel Calleja is the founder and Creative Principle at Innovating Visuals

The Mumbrella Story – With Tim Burrowes

Founder of Mumbrella, Tim Burrowes, talks about the need to properly compensate journalists for content creation. Plus how he started Mumbrella and tips on creating branded content.

Tim Burrowes is an award-winning journalist, publisher and business owner based in Sydney, Australia specialising in the media and marketing industry, including publishing, conferences, awards and training. He is part-owner of Focal Attractions. Founder of Mumbrella, Mumbrella360 and the Mumbrella Awards.

 

What You’ll Learn

  • How Tim founded Mumbrella.
  • What is advocacy journalism?
  • How email is helping promote Mumbrella.
  • Hype or fad? Will brands pull back from content marketing?
  • How much should freelance journalists be compensated?
  • How to begin a content marketing strategy and integrate it into your company.

Key Takeaways

  1. Content marketing builds your community.

  2. Bluenotes ANZ is a good example of a brand newsroom. (Episode 4).

  3. Know your audience and know that it is often different from where the advertising dollars are coming from.

  4. Make high quality content.

  5. Understand what brand storytelling is and what it isnt.

  6. Be prepared to say no to advertorial content if it doesnt serve your audience.

 

Contact

Tim Burrowes LinkedIn

Mumbrella  

Twitter @Mumbrella

 

 

Subscribe on iTunes and never miss an episode of Brand Storytelling